Wisconsin Hop Exchange

Hop Varieties

The artistry of craft brewing is dependent upon the quality of the ingredients. The Wisconsin Hop Exchange presents a diverse catalog of hop varieties in order to satisfy the complexity of taste found in craft brew consumers. Brewers will discover our selection of premium hops reaches from traditional flavors to innovative and aromatic varieties. To learn more about the profiles and qualities of each variety, click on the individual links below.

Interested in buying our hops? Contact Dennis Durow at 608-338-8076.



Brewers Gold

English variety used primarily as a bittering hop. A descendent of Bullion and an heirloom American hop, it is the parent of many popular high-alpha bittering varieties. American-grown Brewer's Gold has a higher percentage of alpha acids than its counterpart in England. Primarily a bittering agent and commonly used in lighter style ales, although it works well in lager beers as well. This bittering or late addition hops has a spice to its flavor and aroma.

Alpha Acids: 7.0-10.0%
Beta Acids: 2.5-4.5%
Cohumulone: 36% – 48%

Total oils: 1.8-2.4%ml/100g
Myrcene 37-40%
Humulene 29-31%
Caryophyllene 7-7.5%
Farnesene < 1%

Flavor/Aroma: Black currant, fruity-spicy

Yield: (Med-High) 1500-2400 lbs/acre

Cone: Small compact cones with dark yellow lupulin and good pickability

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 60-70%

Maturity: Late season

Beer styles: English Ales, Lambic, Porter, Pilsner, Ales.

Possible substitutions: Newport, Magnum, Galena, UK Brewer's Gold, Northern Brewer

Grower notes: Notably slower to break dormancy than most, vigorous and a good climber, good resistance to mildews. Suggested in-row spacing 42".


Cascade

An aroma hop developed by the U.S.D.A. breeding program in Oregon and released in 1972. Popular hop with the U.S. craft brewing industry, its real strength in brewing is in the aroma, as it was the premier aroma hop developed in the U.S. It has a medium strength aroma that provides a unique citrus sometimes compared to grapefruit, floral/spicy character with well-balanced bittering potential and great for dry hopping.

Alpha Acids: 4.5-7.0%
Beta Acids: 4.5-7%
Cohumulone: 33% – 40%

Total oils: 0.7-1.5%ml/100g
Myrcene 45-60%
Humulene 8-16%
Caryophyllene 3.5-5.5%
Farnesene 3.0-7.0%

Flavor/Aroma: citrus, floral, spicy

Yield: (Med) 1400-2000 lbs/acre

Cone: Compact medium size with moderate amount of yellow lupulin and good pickability

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 48-65%

Maturity: Mid-season

Beer styles: American Pale Ales, IPA, Porters, Wheat beers.

Possible substitutions: Centennial, Amarillo, and possibly Columbus

Grower notes: Moderate to vigorous growth rate, finer shrubbery hop bines with lots of late season growth near ground. Moderate to good resistance to mildews and disease. Suggested in- row spacing 36".


Centennial

Aroma variety released by Washington State University in 1990. Sometimes referred to as a super Cascade, however it is lighter on the citrus aromas. It is among the most popular varieties for U.S. craft brewers because of its balance of aroma/bittering/high oils and lupulin content.

Alpha Acids: 9.5% – 11.5%
Beta Acids: 3.5% – 4.5%
Cohumulone: 28% – 30%

Total oils: 1.5 – 2.5ml/100g
Myrcene 28% – 30%
Humulene 10% – 18%
Caryophyllene 5% – 8%
Farnesene < 1%

Flavor/Aroma: floral and citrus; not as citrusy as Cascade, grapefruit

Yield: (Medium) 1500-1750 lbs/acre

Cone: Medium size, compact cones with dark yellow lupulin and good pickability

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 60-65%

Maturity: Early-mid season

Beer styles: All Ale styles, Wheat Beers.

Possible substitutions: Cascade, Amarillo, Columbus, Chinook

Grower notes: Breaks dormancy early, evenly & well. Bines emerge from crown more horizontally, has a moderate growth rate and a good climber after training, with lots of similar sized bines from crown. Moderate susceptibility to disease and pests with susceptibility to Hop mosaic virus. Suggested in-row spacing 36".


Chinook

High alpha dual purpose variety developed by the U.S.D.A. breeding program in Washington State and released in 1985. Gaining in popularity with both craft and major brewers due to its highly acceptable beer aroma profile with smooth bitterness and full flavor.

Alpha Acids: 10.0-14.0%
Beta Acids: 3-4%
Cohumulone: 29% – 35%

Total oils: %ml/100g
Myrcene 35-40%
Humulene 18-25%
Caryophyllene 9-11%
Farnesene <1%

Flavor/Aroma: Heavy aroma, spicy, piney, grapefruit, herbal tones

Yield: (Med) 1600-2000 lbs/acre

Cone: Medium compact cones with dark yellow lupulin and good pickability

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 60-75%

Maturity: Mid to late season

Beer styles: Pale ales, lagers, IPAs, steam beer, and heavy bodied dark ales.

Possible substitutions: Nugget, CTZ, Galena, Northern Brewer

Grower notes: Slower to emerge from dormancy. Good well defined crowns that form large primary bines that have moderate to vigorous growth that climbs well with consistent yields. Moderately good resistance to downy mildew and other pests, however susceptible to powdery mildew. Suggested in-row spacing 42".


Columbia

An all-purpose hop with pungent aromatics and a clean, crisp flavor profile. This hop variety was developed for Budweiser in the 1960's and is Willamette's sister. Bud's brewer's preferred it in 6 out of 6 brew tests over Willamette, but were over-ruled by the head brewer in favor of the softer noble Willamette hop; which went on to be grown for Budweiser. A higher alpha version of Willamette and Columbia's oil profile is identical.

Alpha Acids: 7.6% – 9.0%
Beta Acids: 4%
Cohumulone: 40%

Total oils: 1.2ml/100g
Myrcene 54%
Humulene 17%
Farnesene 4%

Flavor/Aroma: Subtle earth and mild fruit tones of pineapple and bright lemony citrus

Yield: (Med) 1800-2000 lbs/acre

Cone: Medium sized, pointy cones similar to Chinook

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): Good

Maturity: Early to mid-season

Beer styles: Developed for lighter beer styles with a crisp finish, but is also finding use in Ambers, Porters, & Stouts.

Possible substitutions: Centennial, Chinook, Willamette, Fuggle

Grower notes: Vigorous grower with good resistance to mildews. Does not have the late-breaking dormancy issues like Willamette. Suggested in-row spacing 36-42".


Columbus

A super high alpha acid variety included in a group of hops called CTZ (Columbus, Tomahawk, Zeus) that are very closely related sharing the same female parent as Nugget. Originally bred for their high alpha value, they have also become popular for their oil profile. Columbus makes a great dual purpose hops in beer. It has been described as bringing both a bitterness kick as well as strong dreamy aroma.

Alpha Acids: 14.0-17.0%
Beta Acids: 4.0-5.5%
Cohumulone: 28% – 35%

Total oils: 1.5-2.0ml/100g
Mycrene 25-45%
Humulene 15-25%
Caryophyllene 8-12%
Farnesene < 1%

Flavor/Aroma: strong, sharp and citrusy, herbal, earthy

Yield: (Med-High) 2000-2500 lbs./acre

Cone: Medium to large dense cone set born in clusters with pale yellow to yellow lupulin and good pickability.

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 50-60%

Maturity: Mid to late season

Beer styles: American IPAs & Pale Ales, Stout, Lagers

Possible substitutions: Tomahawk, Zeus, Galena, Chinook, Nugget

Grower notes: Moderate to vigorous growth and climbs well, often throws sterile male flowers when stressed which can reduce total yields. Susceptible to mildews and mites. Dense tight cones must be dried carefully.Suggested in-row spacing 30-36".


Crystal

Super aroma triploid variety developed by the U.S.D.A. breeding program and released in 1983. Very mild bittering & highly aromatic, it is perceived as the most pungent of the triploid Hallertau family of hops, and is increasingly popular among U.S. craft brewers for its finishing aromas. The combination of low alpha acids and high myrcene oil content makes it ideal for aroma additions in the wort as it bring with it a mix of woody, green, some floral and fruit notes, with some herb and spice character.

Alpha Acids: 3.0% – 5.5%
Beta Acids: 4.5% – 6.7%
Cohumulone:

Total oils: 0.8-2.1ml/100g
Myrcene 40% – 65%
Humulene 18% – 24%
Caryophyllene 4% – 8%
Farnesene < 1%

Flavor/Aroma: Highly aromatic, pleasant spice and floral tones, similar to Hallertau

Yield: (Med-High) 1200-2200 lbs/acre

Cone: Medium cone size of moderate density with yellow lupulin and good pickability

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 50%

Maturity: Mid to late season

Beer styles: German style pilsner, Lager, Kolsch, ESB, American & Belgian style Ales.

Possible substitutions: Liberty, Mt. Hood, Hallertauer, Herbruck

Grower notes: Moderate to vigorous growth with good color, large bines are smoother than most American types. Good resistance to mildews and pests. Easier to grow than most other Hallertau type hybrids. Oast at reduced temperatures to avoid losing volatile aromatic oils. A top performer in the aromatic class of hops. Suggested in-row spacing 36-42".


Liberty

A triploid Hallertau aroma variety bred by U.S.D.A. and released in 1991. Of the four triploid Hallertau mittlefruh varieties released by U.S.D.A., Liberty most closely resembles the Hallertau mittlefruh cultivar. Growing demand from craft brewers because of its brewing profile. Can contribute bitterness early in the boil and aggressive aroma contributions late in the boil. It is typically used in Lager, Pilsner, Bock, US Wheat, and Kölsch beers.

Alpha Acids: 3.0% – 6%
Beta Acids: 3.0% – 4.0%
Cohumulone: 24% – 30%

Total oils: 0.6-1.2ml/100g
Myrcene 20% – 40%
Humulene 35% – 40%
Caryophyllene 9% – 12%
Farnesene < 1%

Flavor/Aroma: Mild, delicate floral bouquet, slightly spicy, similar to Hallertau

Yield: (Low – Med) 1000-1700 lbs/acre

Cone: Medium compact cone with moderate amounts of dark yellow lupulin and good to excellent pickability.

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 35% – 55%

Maturity: Early to mid-season

Beer styles: Lager, Pilsner, Bock, US Wheat, Kolsch, all Belgian styles

Possible substitutions: Liberty, Mt. Hood, Hallertauer, Herbruck

Grower notes: Takes two seasons to start, however once established has vigorous growth. Avoid wet soils. More disease resistant than the parent Hallertauer variety for resistance to Verticillium wilt and crown rots. Good resistance to mildews. Suggested in-row spacing 36".


Mt. Hood

A triploid noble aroma variety bred from the German Hallertauer variety and released in 1989 from the U.S.D.A. breeding program in Oregon. The most vigorous of the Hallertauer types, Mount Hood has similarities to German Hallertauer and Hersbrucker, and is typically used in Lagers, Pilsners, Bocks, Wheat, Alt, and Helles beers.

Alpha Acids: 30.-8.0%
Beta Acids: 5.0-8.0%
Cohumulone: 21% – 23%

Total oils: 1.0-1.7ml/100g
Myrcene 30-40%
Humulene 15-38%
Caryophyllene 7-16%
Farnesene < 1%

Flavor/Aroma: Clean mild spice, floaral with woodsy pine tone similar to Hallertau

Yield: (Med) 1450-1750 lbs./acre

Cone: Fairly compact medium size with moderate amounts of yellow lupulin and good pickability

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 50-60%

Maturity: Early to mid-season

Beer styles: Lager, Pilsner, Bock, Wheat, Alt, Munich Helles, Bavarian styles

Possible substitutions: Crystal, Hersbucker, Hallertau, Strisselpalt

Grower notes: Moderate to vigorous plant growth showing good resistance to mildews and other pests. Suggested in-row spacing 36".


Nugget

A high alpha variety released in 1983 from the U.S.D.A. breeding program in Oregon. Characterized by a mild herbal aroma and a low proportion of cohumulone, Nugget is increasingly used by brewers as a dual purpose hop for its bittering and aroma profile. It provides the umph in many beer styles that require the hop jolt including imperial style ales. It has a relatively low co-humulone oil content. The myrcene oil content is on the high side, which helps provide some of the woody tones.

Alpha Acids: 11.5-14.0%
Beta Acids: 4.2-5.8%
Cohumulone: 22% – 30%

Total oils: 1.5-3.2ml/100g
Myrcene 48-59%
Humulene 12-22%
Caryophyllene 7-10%
Farnesene < 1%

Flavor/Aroma: Mild herbal aroma, woody tones

Yield: (High) 1700-2200lbs/acre

Cone: Cluster cone structure with heavy, tight moderately long cones and abundant yellow-orange lupulin with good pickability

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 70-80%

Maturity: Mid season

Beer styles: Pale ales, Stouts, IPAs, Imperial style ales

Possible substitutions: Newport, Galena, CTZ, Magnum

Grower notes: Moderate growth rate with large primary bines. Crown buds tend to form high on this variety and buds are more exposed to winter desiccation if not covered in areas with inadequate snow cover. If plants are cut too close to the ground in the spring "blind" plants with no crown buds are common and are slow to recover. Mulch or soil cover may help to protect high buds over the winter. Very good resistance to mildews. Suggested in-row spacing 36 – 42".


Perle (US)

A dual purpose variety with moderate alpha levels and a nice aroma profile and popular with craft & microbrewers. Perle was bred in Germany at the Hop Research Center and made available here in the states in the 1980's. Moderate clean bittering qualities and clean spicy aroma make it a versatile hop for use in a wide range of beers. It is useful anytime throughout the brewing process, and will add a German-like quality to the beer.

Alpha Acids: 7% – 9.5
Beta Acids: 3.0% – 5.0%
Cohumulone: 27% – 32%

Total oils: 0.7-1.2ml/100g
Myrcene 45% – 55%
Humulene 28% – 33%
Caryophyllene 10% – 12%
Farnesene < 1%

Flavor/Aroma: Clean bittering with pleasant floral bouquet and mildly spicy character.

Yield: (Low) 1160-1600 lbs/acre

Cone: Medium rounded light green loose cones with dark yellow lupulin and good pickability.

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 80% – 85%

Maturity: Early season

Beer styles: Pale Ale, Pilsners, Stout, Lager, Weizen, Alt, Barley Wine, Kolsch

Possible substitutions: Northern Brewer, Cluster, Galena, Chinook

Grower notes: Moderate growth rate and vigor, and appears to have very good resistance to mildews and other pests. Suggested in-row spacing 36".


Sterling

A noble/American aroma variety bred from Saaz and a number of other varieties. It has herbal and spicy aroma notes with a hint of floral and citrus. Considered a dual purpose hop, Sterling is perceived to be similar to a combination of Saaz and Mt. Hood, and many brewers use it as a replacement for Saaz. Sterling has a low to moderate co-humulone content as well and is sometimes dubbed as a noble variety. The oil profile results in a slightly spicy fragrance with an herbal floral punch with notes of citrus. It is typically used in Pilsners and Lagers, as well as Belgian-style Ales.

Alpha Acids: 4.5-9%, but typically ends up on the higher side of the scale.
Beta Acids: 4-6%
Cohumulone: 21% – 28%

Total oils: 0.6-1.9ml/100g
Myrcene 44-48%
Humulene 19-23%
Caryophyllene 5-8%
Farnesene 11-17%

Flavor/Aroma: Herbal and spicy aroma notes with a hint of floral and citrus

Yield: (Med) 1200-1800 lbs/acre

Cone: Medium compact cone with pale yellow lupulin and good pickability

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 60-75%

Maturity: Mid-season

Beer styles: Pilsners and Lagers, American and Belgian-style Ales as well as wheat beers

Possible substitutions: Saaz, Polish Lublin, Tettnanger, Mount Hood

Grower notes: Can take a couple years to establish well, however when it does it has moderate to vigorous growth and enters dormancy early. Somewhat susceptible to mildews and viruses. Can be a weak climber at times and show nutrient deficiencies unless water status and fertility levels monitored well. Takes a little higher level of management, however, if managed well, can have very good yields. Suggested in-row spacing 36".


Santiam

An all-purpose triploid seedless aroma hop released by the Agriculture Research Service in 1997, Its resin, oil, and flavor profile are similar to and is commonly a substitute for German Tettnanger, but it has the lower Cohumulone of Hallertau. Santiam adds a spicy character to beers because of its high farnesene content. Santiam can be used anywhere throughout the beer brewing process. In the U.S., it is commonly used to decorate the fragrance of beer styles such as India Pale Ales, and American Pale Ales.

Alpha Acids: 5% – 7.9%
Beta Acids: 5.3% – 8.5%
Cohumulone: 18% – 24%

Total oils: 1.2-2.3ml/100g
Myrcene 25% – 48%
Humulene 13% – 30%
Caryophyllene 5% – 9%
Farnesene 9% – 16%

Flavor/Aroma: Excellent floral bouquet with spicy, sweet fruity noble hop notes, adds a peppery flavor similar to Saaz

Yield: (Med) 1400-2100 lbs/acre

Cone: Small to medium size loose cone with yellow lupulin and good pickability.

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 40% – 50%

Maturity: Mid-season

Beer styles: Lager, US Ales, Pilsner, Belgian Tripel and other Belgian styles, Kolsch, Bock, Munich Helles. Great for wet hopping and adding fragrance to pale ales.

Possible substitutions: Spalter Select, German Tettnanger

Grower notes: Moderate to vigorous growth habit, dark green color, has good strong crown development with tolerance to downy mildew and susceptibility to powdery mildew. Suggested in-row spacing 36".


Southern Cross

A high alpha aroma triploid seedless variety released in 1994 from New Zealand. Typically used in lagers, but finding favor as a versatile dual purpose hop in a variety of craft styles due to its desirable bittering and aroma for brewing. The bitterness is soft and and flavor comes off as a mix between citrus and spice.

Alpha Acids: 11% – 14%
Beta Acids: 5% – 7%
Cohumulone: 25% – 28%

Total oils: 1.2ml/100g
Myrcene 32% – 60%
Humulene 13% – 28%
Caryophyllene 4% – 7%
Farnesene 5% – 7%

Flavor/Aroma: delicate balance of citrus and spice, and bountiful bouquet of lemon zest with pine

Yield: (Med – High) 1800+ lbs/acre

Cone: Elongated moderately dense cones with pale yellow lupulin and good pickability.

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 60% – 70%

Maturity: Mid-season

Beer styles: Lager, but increasingly used in IPAs due to its excellent oils profile

Possible substitutions: No close substitutes

Grower notes: A vigorous grower but not as rangy as some NZ types, wedge-shaped clavate form with the longest sidearms at top and good resistance to mildews and disease. Suggested in-row spacing 42-48".


Tahoma

A dual purpose variety newly released by Washington State University in 2013. Tahoma is a daughter of Glacier that retains the very low cohumulone characteristic of Glacier with somewhat higher alpha acid content. Tahoma has a pleasant aroma with subtle lemon citrus notes.

Alpha Acids: 7.2% – 8.2%
Beta Acids: 8.5% – 9.5%
Cohumulone: 15% – 17%

Total oils: 1.0 – 2.0ml/100g
Myrcene 67% – 72%
Humulene 9% – 11%
Caryophyllene 3% – 3.5%
Farnesene < 1%

Flavor/Aroma: Pleasant aroma with predominate citrus and lemon with cedar, pine, floral, pepper and subtle green melon notes.

Yield: (Med) 1800 – 2000 lbs/acre

Cone: Smaller compact cone, but bines are heavily loaded, especially at top of bine.

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 75%

Maturity: Mid-season

Beer styles: English & American Pale Ales, Stouts, Porters.

Possible substitutions: Glacier, Fuggle, Willamette, Styrian Golding

Grower notes: Similar to Glacier, fast growing, with good resistance to mildews and pests. Suggested in-row spacing 36".


Vanguard

A diploid noble aroma hop released by Washington State in 1993. It has a reputation of having a very similar essential oil profile and aroma to Hallertau mittelfruh. With a very low cohumulone that imparts very smooth and subtle bitter qualities in beer, with a very high humulene oil content similar to a noble profile. Vanguard is used frequently for German-Style beers, but it also adds to the aroma complexity for any number of ales, including Stouts and Imperial Stouts.

Alpha Acids: 4.4% – 6%
Beta Acids: 5% – 7%
Cohumulone: 14% – 16%

Total oils: 0.8 – 1.2ml/100g
Myrcene 20% – 25%
Humulene 45% – 50%
Caryophyllene 12% – 14%
Farnesene < 1%

Flavor/Aroma: Very fragrant refined noble aroma of woody spice, herbal and floral tones similar to Hallertau mittelfruh.

Yield: (Low) 1200-1600 lbs/acre

Cone: Small to medium size and on the loose side, with pale yellow to yellow lupulin and good pickability.

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 75% – 80%

Maturity: Early season

Beer styles: Lager, Pilsner, Bock, Kölsch, W heat, Munich, Helles, and Belgian-style ales

Possible substitutions: Hallertau, Liberty, Mt. Hood, German Hersbrucker

Grower notes: Shows notably better vigor than most Hallertauer cultivars with some resistance to mildews. Suggested in-row spacing 36".


Willamette

A triploid seedless variant of the English Fuggle variety, Willamette was released in 1976 from the U.S.D.A. breeding program. Characterized by a low alpha content, Willamette can contribute bittering of a craft beer. However, its oil profile results in a delicate peppery herbaceous spice that has both a fruit and floral essence making it the most widely grown U.S. flavor aroma hop.

Alpha Acids: 4.0-6.0%
Beta Acids: 3.0-5.0%
Cohumulone: 30% – 35%

Total oils: 1.0-1.5ml/100g
Myrcene 30-55%
Humulene 20-30%
Caryophyllene 6-8.5%
Farnesene 5-6%

Flavor/Aroma: Mild and pleasant fruit, slightly spicy, woody and floral tones, a little earthy

Yield: (Low-Med) 1400-1700 lbs/acre

Cone: Round cone structure, small to medium in size with moderate amounts of dark yellow lupulin and good pickability.

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 60-65%

Maturity: Early to mid-season

Beer styles: English-style Pale Ale, ESB, Bitter, Amber Ales, Porter, Stouts

Possible substitutions: Fuggle, Tettnang, Styrian Golding, Columbia

Grower notes: Vigorous growth habit. Fairly easy to grow. Crown buds form relatively high, so may need winter protection by hilling the rows in fall or mulching. Of the Fuggle types, Willamette is the slowest to break winter dormancy. Needs warm temperatures to really get going –less than optimum production in areas with lake effect cooling , spaced too tightly, or planted in shade. Good resistance to downy mildew, but susceptible to Verticilium wilt and powdery mildew. 24-40" sidearms. Suggested in-row spacing 42".


Yakima Gold

A dual-purpose hop with smooth balanced bittering and pleasant aromas, Yakima Gold was recently released by Washington State University in 2013. An improved, more disease resistant variant of Cluster-type hops. Very high and well balanced oil levels make this a very unusual all-purpose hop. Described as having aggressive American hop aromatics, potentially coming from the cluster parentage. This hop has an intense amount of farnesene in the oil which some brewers associate with noble hop aroma.

Alpha Acids: 8% – 10%
Beta Acids: 4% – 5%
Cohumulone: 21% – 23%

Total oils: 1.9 – 2.3ml/100g
Myrcene 45% – 50%
Humulene 21% – 25%
Caryophyllene 6% – 8%
Farnesene 9% -10%

Flavor/Aroma: Well-balanced aroma profile with pleasant notes, resiny, spicy, fruity, hints of black currant

Yield: (Med – High) 1800-2000 lbs/acre

Cone: No info yet

Storage Stability (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage @ 68 Fahrenheit): 85%

Maturity: No info yet

Beer styles: English and German Ales. Works nicely with noble varieties.

Possible substitutions: Too new yet

Grower notes: Does not appear to be quite as vigorous as Cluster. Has good disease resistance, however susceptible to powdery mildew. High levels of oils may create a stickiness during pelletizing and require additional drying to pelletize correctly.